Chinese live chat cam

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It's estimated that the market could grow to 15 billion yuan this year.

Even Wang Sicong, the son of Chinese billionaire Wang Jianlin, spent thousands of yuan on one South Korean host.

Heo and other South Korean hostesses have a reason to be confident.

Many of them were trained as performers in their home country.

With these new arrivals, some Chinese hosts literally cried as they saw their viewer numbers drop dramatically.

An expanding industry More than 1.5 million users had flooded into South Korean hostess Heo Yun-mi's live streaming chat room. She told Meiri Renwu, a We Chat media outlet, that she was both surprised and grateful the first time she saw such a response.

Heo was once a member of a girl band that produced an EP.

This is one of the reasons South Korea is famous for being a "star-production factory." Many aspiring performers join entertainment agencies at a very young age and are known as trainees.

To keep her edge, Heo said she spends three hours practicing pole dancing and the piano everyday, and watches Chinese TV shows to learn Chinese even when showering.

Only a few go on to become actors or actresses, some become singers, while most trainees are weeded out.

But even those trainees who have been weeded out can end up becoming big hits in the live streaming industry in China since they can easily beat out Chinese hosts who have no training.

Professional performers Compared with Chinese hostesses, those from South Korea are often skilled performers.

Heo said she feels almost no pressure from Chinese hosts.

Watching women eat Dancing is a trump card for many South Korean hostesses, but sometimes audiences still pile in even when they don't dance. During the next three hours, she mainly just sat in a chair and ate cookies as viewers numbering in the tens of thousands watched on. She first rose to fame as pictures of her circulated online.

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